Bard the Bowman

The Black Arrow by Ted Nasmith
The Black Arrow by Ted Nasmith

“Wait! Wait!” [the thrush] said to him. “The moon is rising. Look for the hollow of the left breast as he flies and turns above you!”

“Arrow!” said the bowman. “Black arrow! I have saved you to the last. You have never failed me and always I have recovered you. I had you from my father and he from of old. If ever you came from the forges of the true King under the mountain, go now and speed well!”

The Hobbit, Ch 14 Fire and Water

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Far Over the Misty Mountains Cold

Smaug Flies over the Lonely Mountain by JRR Tolkien
Smaug Flies over the Lonely Mountain by JRR Tolkien

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gleaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.

On silver necklaces they strung
The flowering stars, on crowns they hung
The dragon-fire, in twisted wire
They meshed the light of moon and sun.

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away, ere break of day,
To claim our long-forgotten gold.

Goblets they carved there for themselves
And harps of gold; where no man delves
There lay they long, and many a song
Was sung unheard by men or elves.

The pines were roaring on the height,
The winds were moaning in the night.
The fire was red, it flaming spread;
The trees like torches blazed with light.

The bells were ringing in the dale
And men they looked up with faces pale;
The dragon’s ire more fierce than fire
Laid low their towers and houses frail.

The mountain smoked beneath the moon;
The dwarves they heard the tramp of doom.
They fled their hall to dying fall
Beneath his feet, beneath the moon.

Far over the misty mountains grim
To dungeons deep and caverns dim
We must away, ere break of day,
To win our harps and gold from him!

– JRR Tolkien, The Hobbit

Quotes from The Hobbit

throrsmap
Thorin’s map

“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.”

“Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?”

“It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him.”

“May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks.”

“So comes snow after fire, and even dragons have their endings.”

“May the hair on your toes never fall out!”

“Never laugh at live dragons, Bilbo you fool!”

“Stand by the grey stone when the thrush knocks, and the setting sun with the last light of Durin’s Day will shine upon the key-hole.”

“Truly songs and tales fall utterly short of the reality, O Smaug the Chiefest and greatest of Calamities.”

“If the elf-king had a weakness it was for treasure, especially for silver and white gems; and though his hoard was rich, he was ever eager for more, since he had not yet as great a treasure as other elf-lords of old.”

“If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world” – Thorin Oakenshield