The Ent and the Entwife

Farewell to Fangorn by Luca Bonatti
Farewell to Fangorn by Luca Bonatti

Ent:

When spring unfolds the beechen-leaf and sap is in the bough,
When light is on the wild-wood stream, and wind is on the brow,
When stride is long, and breath is deep, and keen the mountain air,
Come back to me! Come back to me, and say my land is fair!

Entwife:

When Spring is come to garth and field, and corn is in the blade,
When blossom like a shining snow is on the orchard laid,
When sun and shower upon the earth with fragrance fill the air,
I’ll linger here, and will not come, because my land is fair!

Ent:

When Summer lies upon the world, and in a noon of gold
Beneath the roof of sleeping leaves the dreams of trees unfold,
When woodland halls are green and cool, and wind is in the West,
Come back to me! Come back to me, and say my land is best!

Entwife:

When Summer warms the hanging fruit and burns the berry brown;
When straw is gold, and ear is white, and harvest comes to town;
When honey spills, and apple swells, though wind be in the West,
I’ll linger here beneath the Sun, because my land is best!

Ent:

When Winter comes, the winter wild that hill and wood shall slay;
When trees shall fall and starless night devour the sunless day;
When wind is in the deadly East, then in the bitter rain
I’ll look for thee, and call to thee; I’ll come to thee again!

Entwife:

When Winter comes, and singing ends; when darkness falls at last;
When broken is the barren bough, and light and labour past;
I’ll look for thee, and wait for thee, until we meet again:
Together we will take the road beneath the bitter rain!

Both:

Together we will take the road that leads into the West,
And far away will find a land where both our hearts may rest.

——-

(Sung to Merry and Pippin by Treebeard in The Two Towers, written by JRR Tolkien)

Far Over the Misty Mountains Cold

Smaug Flies over the Lonely Mountain by JRR Tolkien
Smaug Flies over the Lonely Mountain by JRR Tolkien

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away ere break of day
To seek the pale enchanted gold.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gleaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.

On silver necklaces they strung
The flowering stars, on crowns they hung
The dragon-fire, in twisted wire
They meshed the light of moon and sun.

Far over the misty mountains cold
To dungeons deep and caverns old
We must away, ere break of day,
To claim our long-forgotten gold.

Goblets they carved there for themselves
And harps of gold; where no man delves
There lay they long, and many a song
Was sung unheard by men or elves.

The pines were roaring on the height,
The winds were moaning in the night.
The fire was red, it flaming spread;
The trees like torches blazed with light.

The bells were ringing in the dale
And men they looked up with faces pale;
The dragon’s ire more fierce than fire
Laid low their towers and houses frail.

The mountain smoked beneath the moon;
The dwarves they heard the tramp of doom.
They fled their hall to dying fall
Beneath his feet, beneath the moon.

Far over the misty mountains grim
To dungeons deep and caverns dim
We must away, ere break of day,
To win our harps and gold from him!

– JRR Tolkien, The Hobbit

Varda

The Silmarillion » Ainur » Valar

Varda “The Exalted”
Queen of the Valar. Other names include: Elbereth (“Star Queen” in Sindarin), Gilthoniel (“Star kindler” in Sindarin), Elentári (“Star Queen” in Quenya), Tintallë (“Star kindler” in Quenya), Fanuilos (“Ever-white” in Sindarin).

She is the greatest of the Vala, her spouse is Manwë and dwells with him in Taniquetil, the highest mountain in Valinor. Varda is said to be too beautiful for words and hears more clearly than all other ears. She created the stars and constellations including the Valacirca, seven stars set in the sky. It was also called “Durin’s Crown” and was the symbol on the door of Moria. Melkor fears and hates Varda the most out of the Valar.

Varda and Manwe in Valinor by Ted Nasmith
Varda and Manwe in Valinor by Ted Nasmith

The Elves were especially fond of Varda and often praise her in songs. Some more famous hymns include:

A Elbereth Gilthoniel
silivren penna míriel
o menel aglar elenath!
Na-chaered paln-díriel
o galadhremmin ennorath
Fanuilos le linnathon
nef aear, si nef aearon!

Samwise’s Praise to Elbereth:
A Elbereth Gilthoniel
o menel palan-díriel,
le nallon sí di’nguruthos!
A tíro nin, Fanuilos!